Young Elementary School

About Young Elementary School

 
At Young Elementary, we use an approach that emphasizes interactive, hands-on, project-based learning. The school focuses on the whole child, recognizing the importance of character education and the social-emotional needs of children while helping them achieve academic excellence.

Founded

Students

Student Spotlight
Character Development

In fourth through eighth grades, students present their learning at their student-led-conferences twice a year. During these conferences, each student shares both the work they’ve done and who they are as learners with the adults in their lives that can help them reach their goals.

Percentages of students who scored 3 or above in spring 2019 on PARCC

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ELA

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Math/Algebra

High-Quality Student Work

The Prompt
Students come to DC all the time on class trips to learn about the city, because it’s the Nation’s Capital. Oftentimes they only see the federal history of DC. How do we help students to also understand that DC has a rich local history?

3rd Grade Class Example Responses

Lucy’s Drawing – African American Civil Rights Memorial

Chelsie Jones

Principal

Megan DeRitter

Assistant Principal of Instruction

Alison Cross

Assistant Principal of Culture

Our Story

Charles Young Elementary School was founded in 1931; it was shuttered in 2008 by DCPS and in August 2015 reopened after extensive renovation as Two Rivers at Young (TRY). The school was named after Colonel Charles Young, the first Black superintendent of the National Park Service, first Black military attache, and highest ranked Black military officer until his death in 1924.

The “Hilltop Campus”, which includes Young Elementary along with three other DC Public School buildings, was a planned, segregated public educational campus in the District of Columbia from 1929 to 1954. In 2016, this entire campus earned a spot on the National Register of Historic Places Program. A tight-knit African-American community blossomed in the adjacent neighborhoods, which include Langston Carver and Kingman Park. In the year prior to opening TRY, we walked these neighborhoods and handed out flyers announcing the return of Young but now as part of the Two Rivers network.

TRY boasts a tremendous front lawn where the community has potlucks, jam sessions, and graduation ceremonies. Inside the building, you will find the original stage, reclaimed wood in the benches, and some features that are common in all Two Rivers buildings: lots of glass and light, sitting steps, and a “green”, where we hold dance competitions and community meetings.

On most Thursdays, we host community meeting at 8:30am. Anyone is welcome! Come and experience the best of our learning community.